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Scaphoid Wrist Fracture

Scaphoid Wrist Fracture

Scaphoid fractures are usually difficult to identify. The scaphoid is relatively smaller than other bones of the hand, so the fracture may not be visible. The scaphoid area may not seem swollen, and one won’t always feel severe pain. As a result, people often ignore a scaphoid fracture, confuse it with a sprained wrist and attempt to self-treat at home. However, left untreated, it may take six months to heal. The medical experts at Advanced Orthopedics in Denver, Parker, or Aurora, Colorado, are skilled at correctly identifying and treating a scaphoid wrist fracture, ensuring you won’t end up with complications that could have a negative impact on your everyday life.

OVERVIEW

Scaphoid wrist fractures, like all bone fractures, can affect anyone. This type of fracture occurs most often after a fall onto an outstretched hand or other accidents. Scaphoid wrist fractures account for 2% to 7% of all fractures and 60% to 70% of carpal bone fractures. They are often found in teens and young adults under 30. People with osteoporosis have an increased risk for all types of broken bones, including scaphoid fractures.

ABOUT THE SCAPHOID

The scaphoid is one of eight carpal bones which form the wrist. It is located on the radial side of the wrist under the thumb. The name “scaphoid” is derived from Greek and means bowl or boat, which is an apt description of its shape. The scaphoid bone can be found by holding the thumb up while looking at the back of the hand. The triangular indentation that’s formed by the tendons of the thumb is called the “anatomic snuffbox.” The scaphoid is located at the bottom of this triangle. The scaphoid is a delicate bone with a precarious blood flow. If that blood supply is cut off, the bone will not receive the nourishment it needs to repair itself.

WHAT IS A SCAPHOID WRIST FRACTURE?

Quite simply, scaphoid fractures are a type of broken wrist. The scaphoid has three parts, all three of which can be broken. Sections of the scaphoid include:

  • Distal pole: the end closest to the forearm
  • Waist: the curved middle of the bone that lies under the anatomic snuffbox
  • Proximal pole: the end closest to the thumb

Read more about Scaphoid wrist fractures on our new Orthopedic News Site – Colorado Orthopedic News. Schedule an appointment with a wrist specialist today.

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