The Anterior Approach to Hip Surgery

Seminar on August 23 at 6:30 pm at Sky Ridge Medical Center in the Auditorium on the Garden Level.

Shoulder Replacement

When is it time to consider shoulder replacement surgery?

And what type of surgery is right for you?

Shoulder replacement surgery requires careful thought and planning, but for those who’ve exhausted other treatment options, it can be the best way to restore range of motion, relieve pain and help you return to an active lifestyle.

Many different conditions can lead to the severe pain and joint degeneration that necessitates a shoulder replacement, including various types of arthritis (osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, post-traumatic arthritis), serious fractures, or a combination of muscle tears and arthritis (such as rotator cuff tear arthropathy).

Understanding the source and nature of your shoulder pain will allow your orthopedic specialist to recommend the right procedure. Depending on the severity and type of condition, there are three types of shoulder replacements that are often considered.

Partial shoulder replacement surgery is often recommended when there is major damage to the head or ball of the upper arm bone (humerus), but the rest of the shoulder is healthy and intact. In this procedure, the ball portion of the upper arm bone is removed and replaced with metal.

Total shoulder replacement surgery is typically used to address arthritis and replaces both the damaged ball (the head of the humerus bone) and socket with metal and/or plastic. While total shoulder replacement recovery can take several months, patients often experience significant improvements in pain and motion following successful surgery and rehabilitation.

Otherwise healthy adults whose rotator cuff and deltoid are intact tend to be good candidates for total shoulder surgery. While there are few age or weight limits obesity, nicotine use and advanced age always increase the risk for post-surgical complications. Patients with severe osteoporosis or susceptibility to infections also have higher risks. 

Reverse shoulder replacement surgery may be the best option when there is significant damage to the shoulder tendons, namely the rotator cuff. If the shoulder joint is arthritic and there is a rotator cuff tear that cannot be repaired, a reverse shoulder replacement may be the best option for surgical treatment.

In this procedure, a prosthetic “ball”, usually metal, is placed on the shoulder socket. A plastic “cup” is then placed where the arthritic ball of the shoulder used to be. In doing so, the anatomy of the shoulder is “reversed” and the deltoid muscle is used to move the shoulder rather than the torn rotator cuff tendons.

Advanced Orthopedic has 10 board certifiedsurgeons who specialize in treatment of shoulder issues. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons considers patients with the following situations potential candidates for reverse rotator cuff surgery:

• A completely torn rotator cuff that cannot be repaired
• Rotator cuff tear arthropathy
• A previous shoulder replacement that was unsuccessful
• Severe shoulder pain and difficulty lifting your arm away from your side or over your head
• A complex fracture of the shoulder joint
• A chronic shoulder dislocation
• A tumor of the shoulder joint
• Patients who have tried other treatments, such as rest, medications, cortisone injections, and physical therapy, that have not relieved shoulder pain

If shoulder pain is severely limiting your daily activities or range of motion,and any of these descriptions apply, it might be time to raise your hand for shoulder replacement surgery. Contact our office to set an appointment.

Best Shoulder Surgeons

A. Todd Alijani, MD

Dr. A. Todd Alijani



Dr. Mark Failinger


James Ferrari, MD

Dr. James Ferrari


Wayne Gersoff, MD

Dr. Wayne Gersoff


Davis Hurley, MD

Dr. Davis Hurley


Cary Motz, MD

Dr. Cary Motz


H. Andrew Motz, MD

Dr. H. Andrew Motz



Dr. Justin Newman


John Papilion, MD

Dr. John Papilion


Dr. Micah Worrell

Dr. Micah Worrell


Dr. Keith Jacobson - 2018-2019 President-Elect for ABFAS

Dr. Keith Jacobson Elected as 2018-2019 President-Elect by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery

DENVER – July 26, 2018 –Advanced Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Specialists is pleased to announce that Keith Jacobson, DPM will serve as an executive officer of the 2018-2019 American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery (ABFAS) President-Elect. His term begins September 1.

Dr. Jacobson is board certified in reconstructive rear foot/ankle surgery and foot surgery

By the American Board of Podiatric Surgery. He’s a national expert in foot surgery and reconstructive rear foot and ankle surgery and specializes in foot and ankle trauma and reconstruction in both adults and pediatrics. His areas of focus include:

  • Reconstructive Foot and Ankle Surgery
  • Foot and Ankle Trauma
  • Cartilage Replacement in the Ankle
  • Total Ankle Replacement
  • Arthroscopy of the Foot and Ankle

As a longtime ABFAS board member, Dr. Jacobson has also served asa chair for the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery Computer-based Patient Simulation Committee.

About Advanced Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Specialists

Advanced Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Specialists is widely recognized as the regional leader in comprehensive orthopedic services. The 19 physicians of Advanced Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Specialists have received specialized training in orthopedic surgery and in subspecialty areas within the field of orthopedic medicine. They diagnose and treat even the most complicated orthopedic conditions and are supported by a professional staff of physician assistants, medical assistants, x-ray technicians and administrative personnel at our two offices in Denver and Parker. Learn more at advancedortho.org. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram

Bunion Foot Pain

Painful bump on the side of your big toe? Why you shouldn’t ignore a bunion.

That painful bony bump on the side of your big toe? It’s probably a bunion. Nearly a quarter of people age 18-65 have bunions, making them one of the most common foot issues among adults. They also run in families and are more prevalent among women (thanks, cute heels), and among those over 65. In fact, more than a third of people over age 65 (36 percent) have bunions.

Whether it runs in your family or you’ve been choosing fashion over function, there are five key things you should know to deal with your bunion and move past the pain.

What causes bunion pain?

We know what predisposes people to getting bunions, but what’s happening with our feet to cause so much pain?  It starts when your big toe begins to turn in toward your second toe. As that happens, the joint at base of the big toe bone pushes out to the side, where it meets your footbone (called the first metatarsal) and that pressure causes pain. This area carries a great deal of weight when you are standing or walking, and that pressure causes pain. The area may become red and callused over time. The pain can become so severe that it’s difficult to wear shoes.

Bunions range from mild to severe and should be treated differently

Depending on how prominent and painful your bunion is, your orthopedic or podiatric surgeonmay recommend a variety of treatments that can slow the progression of your bunion, or minimize the pain, but surgery is the only way to truly correct the situation. Beware of ‘treatments’ claiming non-surgical bunion removal.

Popular methods to manage bunion pain and slow progression are wearing supportive well-fitting shoes that align your foot properly for walking, using orthotics or a gel pad to cushion the area when wearing shoes and wearing a splint at night.

There are a variety of available orthotics (or orthoses) including over-the-counter or off-the-shelf commercial products and, as necessary, custom-molded orthotics that are generally prescribed medical devices.

Bunion surgery may be needed

Moderate or severe bunions and can involve cutting the joint at the big toe and then aligning it properly. In more severe cases, the entire joint may be replaced with metal plates and screws.  See a video animation of how surgery corrects the bunion. 

Don’t ignore bunion pain

If you let a bunion become too severe, you are likely to run out of non-surgical options for pain relief and may even need to consider a more involved surgical procedure such as replacing a joint in your toe or fusing bones together. This equates to a longer and more complex recovery time, not to mention prolonging your pain unnecessarily by not seeing a doctor and making a treatment plan. If you’ve had pain for a year or more, it’s definitely time to see a doctor to review your options.

Recovery takes time
The most common kind of bunion surgery is on an out-patient basis and takes around two months to recover. Your doctor will work with you to create a recovery plan which may include a special boot, rest, stretching and/or physical therapy. Active adults who want to return to load bearing exercise like running and jumping may need longer to get back in the action – but that’s time well spent if they can return to their activities bunion and pain free.

Learn more about your bunion treatment options with one of our podiatric surgeons:

Best Foot and Ankle Surgeons

Keith Jacobson, DPM

Dr. Keith Jacobson


Alan Ng, DPM

Dr. Alan Ng


Scott Resig, MD

Dr. Scott Resig


Orthopedic Centers of Colorado Selects Clarify Health as Partner for Real-Time Patient Guidance

Colorado’s largest independent orthopedic, spine, and hand surgery group deploys Clarify’s Care Journey Platform to streamline clinician workflow and improve patient experience